April 9, 2019 8:03 am Written by

The Cost to Learn to Drive

How Much Does it Cost to Get Your Drivers Licence

If you own a car then you know, it is not cheap to have the freedom of running up and down the roadways and motorways. There is a price to be paid for this freedom of conveyance.

You have to buy a car, which are not cheap.

Pay for insurance, which can be costly.

Then there is the expenses of maintenance, repairs, MOT, road tax, petrol, maybe parking charges, when does it end?!

However, we need to start at the beginning, the beginning cost/expense of just getting your licence to drive.

Just to get the privilege of driving a car on our road and motorways, you need a licence by law, and to get that licence, you must pay, in addition to passing some tests.

Which have fees attached to them.

And to pass the tests associated with getting your drivers licence, you must practice, take lessons, and lessons are not cheap.

Technically, lessons can be free, if someone you know is willing to take you out driving to practice. However, you may find that lessons from a proper, trained instructor is worth the investment.

For 2018 according to comparison web site Go compare, the “cost of getting a young driver on the road” is now £6,959!

This figure is made up of:

* Average amount spent on first car

* Driving lessons

* Fees associated with getting a licence

* Road tax

* Insurance (which can vary according to region and the driver’s age)

Gocompare’s Matt Oliver stated, “The cost of getting a young driver on the road has increased again but this is down to the new motorists splashing out more on their first car.”

The cost of the insurance has actually fallen substantially in the last few years whilst the price of tests and lessons has been static.”

New drivers should also be wary of the fee-charging application services which appear to have sprung up online. Much like the sites which charge people when applying for free EHICs, these services add little to no value and can triple the cost of obtaining a provisional license.”

Car insurance for younger drivers is still pricey compared to those who’ve got a few thousand safe miles under their belts.”

Unfortunately, statistics show that newly qualified drivers are more likely to have accidents, and when they do, they tend to be more serious and the claims are bigger, hence the higher premiums.”

Choosing the right car, preferably with a smaller engine to start with, and selecting a telematics or ‘black box’ type of insurance policy can help to keep costs down when starting out.”

For some young drivers they are being priced off the road.

They cannot afford to pay for lessons, buy a car, and the insurance. Insurance for young drivers can cost in the thousands each year, with some insurers pricing the insurance so high it is out of the reach of many young drivers.

Cost of Driving Lessons

As mentioned, while you can have someone teach you to drive for free, the odds are no one really wants that responsibility, in addition to you driving their car.

Hiring a professional driving instructor can be a good investment, but how much of an investment is driving lessons.

According to the Driving Standards Agency, lessons could cost £20 to £30 per lesson, with learners needing on average 47 lessons, and 22 hours of practice driving.

If we use £25 per lesson as an average, that equates to well over £1,000!

Then to this you need to add the cost of a provisional licence, and the theory and practical test fees.

This adds up to another £150 or more depending on when you take the test.

So before you have even bought a car, or taken out insurance, you could be £1,150 or more financially lighter just learning to drive.

Heaven forbid you fail the driving test and require more lessons, and more test fees.

It is easy to see why some people never drive, and with public transportation being so readily available, it is a sound option and way to get around.

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